People

Fiona MacintoshPhotograph of Professor Fiona Macintosh

Director
fiona.macintosh@classics.ox.ac.uk
Fiona Macintosh is Professor of Classical Reception and Fellow of St Hilda’s College, University of Oxford. She joined the APGRD as Senior Research Fellow in January 2000 after holding a permanent lectureship in English at Goldsmiths’ College, University of London (1995-1999). She was Reader in Greek and Roman Drama (2008-2014) and has been the Director of the APGRD since 2010. She is the author of Dying Acts (Cork 1994), Greek Tragedy and the British Theatre 1660-1914 (Oxford 2005 – with Edith Hall), Sophocles’ Oedipus Tyrannus (Cambridge 2009), and Performing Epic or telling tales (Oxford 2019 - with Justine McConnell). She has edited numerous APGRD volumes, Medea in Performance (2000), Dionysus Since 69 (2004), Agamemnon in Performance 458BC-AD 2005 (2005), The Ancient Dancer in the Modern World (2010), Choruses, Ancient and Modern (2012), The Oxford Handbook of Greek Drama in the Americas (2015), Epic Performances from the middle ages into the twenty-first century (2018), and Heaney and the Classics: Bann Valley Muses (2019). She is also co-curator of the APGRD’s two interactive/multimedia e-books, Medea, a performance history (2016) and Agamemnon, a performance history (2020).
Fiona Macintosh's publications (PDF) >> 

 

Profile photo of APGRD ArchivistClaire Kenward

Archivist & Researcher
claire.kenward@classics.ox.ac.uk
Dr Claire Kenward became the APGRD's Archivist in 2014. Claire has published on the reception of Greek drama and epic in early modern England, and on classics in Science Fiction and Fantasy. She is co-editor of Epic Performances from the Middle Ages into the Twenty-First Century (OUP 2018). Claire is responsible for the curation and development of the APGRD's Digital Resources - she is co-author, co-curator, and designer of the APGRD’s two interactive/multimedia ebooks, Medea – a performance history (2016) and Agamemnon – a performance history (2020).  She has curated and supervised a number of exhibitions at Oxford's Faculty of Classics and at St Hilda's Jacqueline du Pré Music Building. Claire completed her doctorate on receptions of Hecuba at the University of Warwick. She began working for the APGRD in 2013 as an early career associate, researching the influence of ancient epics on medieval and early modern English drama, for the Leverhulme-funded Performing Epic project. 
Claire Kenward's publications and exhibitions (PDF) >> 

 

Claire BarnesPortrait photo of Claire Barnes

Archivist Administrator

Claire Barnes is the APGRD's Archivist Administrator. Her background is in Classics and English (BA) and Classical Reception (MPhil), followed by a spell working in PR and copywriting before returning to Oxford. Claire's current research looks at the relationship between classical reception and personal authenticity in early- to mid-20th century literature.

 

Tom Wrobel

Developer (2011-2016)
thomas.wrobel@bodleian.ox.ac.uk
Dr Tom Wrobel joined the APGRD as Web and database developer in January 2011. After working on the Dictionary of Medieval Latin from British Sources, he returned to the project in 2014. From 2015 to 2016 Tom was the designer and co-curator for the APGRD's interactive/multimedia ebook project. Tom completed his DPhil thesis at the University of Oxford on 'The junior officers of the Roman army, 91BC—AD14' in 2010, and has developed websites for a number of colleges and academic projects. He was also responsible for building the new version of the APGRD website and expanding the APGRD's public resources online.

Naomi Setchell

Archivist Administrator (2010-2014); Honorary/Consultant Archivist (ongoing)
Naomi Setchell joined the APGRD in the new role of archivist/administrator in January 2010. She left in August 2014, but continues to advise the APGRD as an honorary consultant. With an interdisciplinary background in Anthropology (BSc) and the History of Ideas (MA), Naomi qualified in Archives & Records Management (MA) after working with collections in the National Theatre, the V&A Theatre Museum, National Life Stories at the British Library, and the Smithsonian Center for Folklife & Cultural Heritage.